Ventana Modal

Este contenido se reemplaza via ajax por el del html externo.

×

Ventana Modal

Este contenido se reemplaza via ajax por el del html externo.

×

Ventana Modal

Este contenido se reemplaza via ajax por el del html externo.

×

×

Ventana Modal

Este contenido se reemplaza via ajax por el del html externo.

×

| 12/26/2018 5:46:00 PM

La increíble hazaña del hombre que cruzó la Antártida a pie y sin ayuda de nadie

Colin O'Brady, un extriatleta profesional de 33 años, hizo un extremo sendero de casi 1.600 kilómetros atravesando las más inhóspitas condiciones. Por sus aventuras lo llaman el escalador más rápido de las siete cumbres.

Hombre cruza la Antártida a pie y sin ayuda de nadie Colin O'Brady ha registrado toda su aventura en Instagram. Foto: Instagram

Casi 1.600 kilómetros en 54 días, solo y sin asistencia: un estadounidense que atravesó la Antártida de norte a sur a pie en solitario se convirtió esta semana en la primera persona en realizar tal hazaña. "Logré mi objetivo: convertirme en la primera persona en la historia en cruzar el continente antártico de costa a costa, solo, sin ayuda", escribió Colin O‘Brady, un extriatleta profesional de 33 años, en su cuenta de Instagram.

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

Day 54: FINISH LINE!!! I did it! The Impossible First ?. 32 hours and 30 minutes after leaving my last camp early Christmas morning, I covered the remaining ~80 miles in one continuous “Antarctica Ultramarathon” push to the finish line. The wooden post in the background of this picture marks the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf, where Antarctica’s land mass ends and the sea ice begins. As I pulled my sled over this invisible line, I accomplished my goal: to become the first person in history to traverse the continent of Antarctica coast to coast solo, unsupported and unaided. While the last 32 hours were some of the most challenging hours of my life, they have quite honestly been some of the best moments I have ever experienced. I was locked in a deep flow state the entire time, equally focused on the end goal, while allowing my mind to recount the profound lessons of this journey. I’m delirious writing this as I haven’t slept yet. There is so much to process and integrate and there will be many more posts to acknowledge the incredible group of people who supported this project. But for now, I want to simply recognize my #1 who I, of course, called immediately upon finishing. I burst into tears making this call. I was never alone out there. @jennabesaw you walked every step with me and guided me with your courage and strength. WE DID IT!! We turned our dream into reality and proved that The Impossible First is indeed possible. “It always seems impossible until it’s done.” - Nelson Mandela. #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

Una publicación compartida de Colin O‘Brady (@colinobrady) el

Para sumar épica a esta proeza, O‘Brady cubrió los últimos 125 kilómetros en 32 horas tras decidir hacer la última etapa de un tirón."Mientras hervía agua para prepararme el desayuno, una pregunta aparentemente imposible surgió en mi mente", escribió O‘Brady en Instagram. "Me pregunté: ¿Será posible hacer el camino que me queda hasta la meta de una tirada?"

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

Day 52: SAVOR AND FOCUS. Somehow I am still going uphill ??‍??. I spent the first 6 hours of the day climbing up again to 8300ft (only 1000ft net lower than the Pole). I feel like I am stuck in an M.C. Echer drawing where every direction leads up, a never ending staircase. In this photo I finally crested the big hill looking out on the mountains that lead to my finish line at sea level. Perhaps now I really am going down for good. In these final days I’m reminding myself of two things: First - savor these moments. I’m very eager to finish, but before I know it, I’ll be reflecting on this adventure with nostalgia. So while I’m still out here, I’m trying to enjoy it as much as possible. The second thing is - I need to stay hyper focused on execution. It’s not over until it’s over. Henry Worsely, who was a huge inspiration of mine, tragically lost his life less than 100 miles from completing this traverse. When I was crossing Greenland earlier this year on my very last night, I decided to relax my usual evening routine and didn’t check my campsite well enough and fell waist deep into a crevasse that was 200ft deep. If I’d fallen all the way to the bottom, it could have been game over. It’s often at the end when we are tired that mistakes happen. So for that reason I’m ensuring that I stay hyper focused on all of the details. Merry Christmas Eve everyone. Dear Santa??, All I want for Christmas is a stable high pressure weather system to bring ?? and no wind. Sincerely, Colin #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

Una publicación compartida de Colin O‘Brady (@colinobrady) el

"Para cuando me estaba atando las botas, el plan imposible se había convertido en un objetivo consolidado", dijo. Su posición, definida por un GPS, era indicada cada día en su sitio web colinobrady.com. O‘Brady salió junto al británico Louis Rudd, un exmilitar de 49 años, el 3 de noviembre del glaciar Union, en la Antártida, para ver quién lograba ser el primero en completar la hazaña de cruzar a pie solo y sin asistencia el continente helado. Caminaron por separado.

Tras pasar por el Polo Sur el 12 de diciembre, O‘Brady terminó su viaje el miércoles en la barrera de hielo de Ross, al borde del Océano Pacífico. Rudd le sigue a uno o dos días de distancia. "A pesar de que las últimas 32 horas han sido algunas de las horas más exigentes de mi vida, con toda honestidad han sido de los mejores momentos que he tenido", dijo el estadounidense. 

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

Day 46: GRAVITY. I feel like I’m flying!!! Well I must say it feels really nice to have gravity working in my favor for once. I only descended 100ft over the course of the day, but it was enough to give me a physical and emotional boost as I covered my furthest distance of the expedition, 25.5 miles...almost a marathon! Remember week 3 when I was getting crushed by the deep snow and only moving 10-11 miles everyday? That was brutal, but I kept imagining a day like today would eventually come so I kept getting out of my tent each morning and showing up. I believe this is often the case with any big goal. There are so many challenges along the way, and in those moments it’s so easy to want to quit. However it’s in those moments when we need to strengthen our resolve, knowing that one day all the challenge and turmoil of battling the metaphorical deep snow will pay off. No matter what you are currently working on, remember one day the uphill will turn to downhill and the deep snow will give way to firm ground and then you’ll feel like you are flying and it will all be worth it. #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

Una publicación compartida de Colin O‘Brady (@colinobrady) el

Con un cuarto de la superficie de su cuerpo gravemente quemado por un accidente en Tailandia en 2008, los médicos le dijeron que nunca podría volver a caminar normalmente, según la biografía de su sitio. El diario The New York Times describió el esfuerzo de O‘Brady como uno de los "hechos más notables de la historia polar", a la altura de la "carrera por conquistar el Polo Sur" entre el noruego Roald Amundsen y el inglés Robert Falcon Scott en 1911.

O‘Brady, nacido en Portland, Oregón (noroeste de Estados Unidos), estudió economía en la prestigiosa Universidad de Yale, donde formó parte del equipo de natación, según su sitio web. En 1996-97, un explorador noruego llamado Borge Ousland atravesó por primera vez la Antártida en soledad, pero recibió ayuda de terceros con cometas a lo largo de su travesía. En 2016 un oficial del ejército inglés, el teniente coronel Henry Worsley, había intentado realizar la misma proeza, pero murió cuando buscaba terminar sin asistencia la travesía.

Ver esta publicación en Instagram

Day 28: BOUNCE BACK!! Jumping for joy after knocking out 19.2 miles today to make up for a lost day yesterday. It was still pretty tough conditions today with full whiteout and HUGE sastrugui. I took some hard falls today not being able to see where I was going, but still managed to get some really solid mileage and climbing done. I’d say a little rest did the body good. Though I was surprised I got more than an inch off the ground on this jump at the end of the day...legs are tired!! The lesson today is about knowing how to hit the reset button. I was frustrated and discouraged in my tent last night, but I woke up this morning to a new day of opportunity. I think it’s important to always remember you can’t change the past, but you can wake up, turn the page, and give today your very best. #TheImpossibleFirst #BePossible

Una publicación compartida de Colin O‘Brady (@colinobrady) el

Este no es el primer récord de O‘Brady. En 2016, escaló a las cumbres más altas de los siete continentes, incluido el Everest, en 132 días, lo que lo convirtió en el "escalador más rápido de las siete cumbres".

EDICIÓN 1957

PORTADA

Elecciones 2019: Revolcón Político

Colombia giró al centro y los votantes prefirieron las opciones moderadas por encima de las radicales de la izquierda y la derecha. Así se reconfiguró del mapa del poder local y regional.

Queremos conocerlo un poco,
cuéntenos acerca de usted:

Maria,

Gracias por registrarse en SEMANA Para finalizar el proceso, por favor valide su correo a través del enlace que enviamos a:

correo@123.com

Maria,

su cuenta aun no ha sido activada para poder leer el contenido de la edición impresa. Por favor valide su correo a través del enlace que enviamos a:

correo@123.com

Para verificar su suscripción, por favor ingrese la siguiente información:

O
Ed. 1958

¿No tiene suscripción? ¡Adquiérala ya!

Su código de suscripción no se encuentra activo.